What is it?
The final revamp for the current Honda Accord, before the new model arrives in late 2008. The Sport GT is intended to offer an ideal combination of dynamics and comfort, boasting a very respectable trim level plus all the trappings of a semi-sporting model including sports seats, stiffened suspension, some faux carbonfibre in the dash and aggressive styling on the outside.
The real reason for this model is to promote sales of the Accord to executive buyers – a difficult task given the tempting array of new models currently flooding this class.
What’s it like?
Accomplished, if lacking in any particular brilliance. The familiar 2.2 i-CTDi engine is the only unit available in the Sport GT – a great bonus as it offers a good range of flexibility, power and refinement as well as a 50.1mpg claimed economy.
Honda’s six-speed gearbox is also standard, offering good motorway cruising ability as well as an accurate shift movement for more demanding roads.
Body control and chassis response were already good in the standard Accord. The sports suspension fitted to the Sport GT doesn’t change that, and it also gives the car sharper dynamics at high speeds. But the ride quality is seriously compromised. The GT crashes over severe disturbances at low speeds, and fails to absorb poor surfaces that the standard Accord would manage.
Even so, the Sport GT is a comfortable place to be. All the usual Accord attributes are there, including good cabin soundproofing, comfortable driving position (aided by the extra lateral support in the GT’s seats), and well-weighted controls.
The styling is also a big asset, still looking fresh on today’s roads, especially in the Premium White Pearl of the car shown here.
Should I buy one?
Yes, if you want a car that offers a good combination of comfort, economy and performance, plus one of the best diesel engines on the market.
The Sport GT seems hard to justify when you consider the new models recently released, but it’s still £5000 cheaper than the equivalent new 3-series or C-class, and has a superior engine to the Mondeo’s 2.0-litre diesel. For plenty of buyers, these reasons alone will be enough to overlook the Accord’s imminent replacement.
What is it?
The final revamp for the current Honda Accord, before the new model arrives in late 2008. The Sport GT is intended to offer an ideal combination of dynamics and comfort, boasting a very respectable trim level plus all the trappings of a semi-sporting model including sports seats, stiffened suspension, some faux carbonfibre in the dash and aggressive styling on the outside.
The real reason for this model is to promote sales of the Accord to executive buyers – a difficult task given the tempting array of new models currently flooding this class.
What’s it like?
Accomplished, if lacking in any particular brilliance. The familiar 2.2 i-CTDi engine is the only unit available in the Sport GT – a great bonus as it offers a good range of flexibility, power and refinement as well as a 50.1mpg claimed economy.
Honda’s six-speed gearbox is also standard, offering good motorway cruising ability as well as an accurate shift movement for more demanding roads.
Body control and chassis response were already good in the standard Accord. The sports suspension fitted to the Sport GT doesn’t change that, and it also gives the car sharper dynamics at high speeds. But the ride quality is seriously compromised. The GT crashes over severe disturbances at low speeds, and fails to absorb poor surfaces that the standard Accord would manage.
Even so, the Sport GT is a comfortable place to be. All the usual Accord attributes are there, including good cabin soundproofing, comfortable driving position (aided by the extra lateral support in the GT’s seats), and well-weighted controls.
The styling is also a big asset, still looking fresh on today’s roads, especially in the Premium White Pearl of the car shown here.
Should I buy one?
Yes, if you want a car that offers a good combination of comfort, economy and performance, plus one of the best diesel engines on the market.
The Sport GT seems hard to justify when you consider the new models recently released, but it’s still £5000 cheaper than the equivalent new 3-series or C-class, and has a superior engine to the Mondeo’s 2.0-litre diesel. For plenty of buyers, these reasons alone will be enough to overlook the Accord’s imminent replacement.

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