What is it?
It’s a car that Hyundai reckons could become a serious rival for eco-superminis like the VW Polo Bluemotion. No, seriously.
The three-pot version of the revised i10, called Blue, could be a worthy contender. Its new 1.0-litre motor has 68bhp and trims a second from the 0-62mph of the old 1.1 i10. But the Blue also comes with stop-start, low-resistance tyres and a gearshift indicator, so it delivers 67.3mpg, a rise of 8.4mpg over the 1.1, and CO2 emissions of just 99g/km.
Elsewhere, the i10 gets a mild styling refresh and extra toys in the cabin (air-con is now standard across the range, and some of the interior fabrics have been improved). It still feels basic, but in a rugged, well built way.
What’s it like?
The good news is that on the road, the i10’s key strengths – a willing, neutral chassis, feelsome steering and a super-slick, short-throw gearshift – are all still present. Even with just three cylinders, the Blue is a hoot around town. The trick tyres are a little noisier and they don’t help the ride, but nor do they ruin it.
There is a catch, though – and it is that the smallest engine no longer sits at the bottom of the range. Those green mods – and the stop-start system in particular, one suspects – lift the Blue’s price to £9195; that’s over a grand cheaper than any other sub-100g/km car, admittedly, and almost £6k less than the Polo Bluemotion, but it’s £1000 more expensive than the refreshed i10 1.2 Classic.
Should I buy one?
If you simply must have a green supermini, then, the Hyundai is an appealing high-value proposition. But in the realm of i10s, we’d save a few quid on the list price and stick with the 1.2.
John McIlroy
Hyundai i10 Blue
Price: £9195; Top speed: 93mph; 0-62mph: 14.8sec; Economy: 67.3mpg; CO2: 99g/km; Kerb weight: 1000kg (est); Engine: 3 cyls, 998cc, petrol; Power: 68bhp at 6200rpm; Torque: 70lb ft at 3500rpm; Gearbox: 5-spd manual
What is it?
It’s a car that Hyundai reckons could become a serious rival for eco-superminis like the VW Polo Bluemotion. No, seriously.
The three-pot version of the revised i10, called Blue, could be a worthy contender. Its new 1.0-litre motor has 68bhp and trims a second from the 0-62mph of the old 1.1 i10. But the Blue also comes with stop-start, low-resistance tyres and a gearshift indicator, so it delivers 67.3mpg, a rise of 8.4mpg over the 1.1, and CO2 emissions of just 99g/km.
Elsewhere, the i10 gets a mild styling refresh and extra toys in the cabin (air-con is now standard across the range, and some of the interior fabrics have been improved). It still feels basic, but in a rugged, well built way.
What’s it like?
The good news is that on the road, the i10’s key strengths – a willing, neutral chassis, feelsome steering and a super-slick, short-throw gearshift – are all still present. Even with just three cylinders, the Blue is a hoot around town. The trick tyres are a little noisier and they don’t help the ride, but nor do they ruin it.
There is a catch, though – and it is that the smallest engine no longer sits at the bottom of the range. Those green mods – and the stop-start system in particular, one suspects – lift the Blue’s price to £9195; that’s over a grand cheaper than any other sub-100g/km car, admittedly, and almost £6k less than the Polo Bluemotion, but it’s £1000 more expensive than the refreshed i10 1.2 Classic.
Should I buy one?
If you simply must have a green supermini, then, the Hyundai is an appealing high-value proposition. But in the realm of i10s, we’d save a few quid on the list price and stick with the 1.2.
John McIlroy
Hyundai i10 Blue
Price: £9195; Top speed: 93mph; 0-62mph: 14.8sec; Economy: 67.3mpg; CO2: 99g/km; Kerb weight: 1000kg (est); Engine: 3 cyls, 998cc, petrol; Power: 68bhp at 6200rpm; Torque: 70lb ft at 3500rpm; Gearbox: 5-spd manual

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